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    Florida State College at Jacksonville
   
 
  Dec 12, 2018
 
2013-2014 Catalog [Aug. 2013-Aug. 2014] 
    
2013-2014 Catalog [Aug. 2013-Aug. 2014] [Archived Catalog]

Academics


Special Academic Programs
Grading Policies
Standards of Academic Progress
Prior Learning Assessment
Glossary of Terms
Twenty-five Secrets to College Success


Special Academic Programs

The Honors Academy

The Honors Academy offers students the opportunity to be a part of an academic environment that is intentionally designed to foster academic excellence. Students have the opportunity to enroll in stimulating designated Honors courses with exceptional faculty and other outstanding students.

Students who have a weighted average GPA of 3.5 in high school or who have a cumulative GPA of 3.5 after 12 semester hours of college level courses may apply for admittance into the Honors Academy. Students admitted into the Honors Academy must register for the Honors Colloquia (one credit hour) and the Honors seminar (two credit hours) and maintain a GPA of 3.5 or higher. Three scholarships are open to honors students.

Distance Learning Opportunities

For many students today, time to attend traditional college classes is a luxury they cannot afford. Family, work, and personal responsibilities often take first priority for time and become a barrier to traditional educational opportunities. To meet the needs of these students, Florida State College at Jacksonville offers a variety of alternative learning opportunities that require minimal or no attendance at site–based classes and/or testing.

Online Courses

Online courses are offered via the Internet, enabling students to study and participate in the virtual class at times convenient to their personal schedule. Students and teachers communicate via e–mail, discussion boards (for asynchronous communication) and live chat rooms.

Students must be self–disciplined and motivated to succeed in online learning. A reliable computer and Internet connection and Web browser are necessary to successfully navigate the course management system utilized for online courses. Current versions of browsers required (Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari), an e–mail account provided by the College, Windows 98 or newer version, and virus–checking software are all essential components for students to enroll in online courses. For additional information about online learning, visit the Distance Learning Web site or call the Welcome Center at (904) 359-5433.

Military and Government Programs

Army ROTC

Florida State College at Jacksonville students interested in a commission as an officer in the United States Army may enroll in the basic Army ROTC College program at the University of North Florida. Students will be enrolled as Military Science Leadership students, college program students, or Army ROTC scholarship students based on the program in which they are accepted. Students who successfully complete the basic course are eligible to enter the advanced program at any university that offers Army ROTC. Students in the basic course may also be eligible for selection to the Army ROTC scholarship program. For information on the Army ROTC scholarship program contact the Army ROTC office at University of North Florida, Lieutenant Colonel B. Scott Jones, at (904) 620-3918.

Navy ROTC

Florida State College at Jacksonville students interested in a commission as an officer in the United States Navy or the United States Marine Corps may enroll in the basic NROTC College program and take naval science courses at Jacksonville University. Students will be enrolled as Naval Science students, college program students, or NROTC scholarship students based on the program in which they are accepted. Students who successfully complete the basic course are eligible to enter the advanced program at any university that offers NROTC. Students in the basic course may also be eligible for selection to the NROTC scholarship program. For information on the NROTC scholarship programs visit the Navy ROTC Web page or contact the Navy ROTC office at Jacksonville University at (904) 256-7480.

Military Education Institute and Government Programs

The Military Education Institute and Government Programs exist for the purpose of developing and coordinating education and training opportunities for military service personnel, their family members, government employees, and local community residents in the Jacksonville area. To accomplish this mission, the College provides:

  1. college credit courses with an emphasis on the General Education Requirements offered at military installations during traditional semester terms and eight–week terms;
  2. classes offered at military installations enable enrollment throughout the year in the associate in arts and selected associate in science programs;
  3. distance learning classes in associate in arts and selected associate in science programs, as a member of the Navy College Program Distance Learning Partnership (NCPDLP), SOCNAV, SOCCOAST AFLOAT program, SOCCOAST, Army National Guard Education Service Center Education Partner program; SOCGUARD, SOCAD, Army Career Degree Builders, U.S. Army Concurrent Admissions Program (ConAP); and SOCMAR;
  4. a full range of advising, registration and orientation services, including placement testing;
  5. evaluation of military and corporate training and experience by submitting the appropriate American Council on Education (ACE) Registry Transcript (SMART for U.S. Navy and Marine Corps and AARTS for U.S. Army and Army National Guard) and/or an institutional transcript from a military institution (CCAF – Community College of the Air Force, USCGI – United States Coast Guard Institute). Military and government personnel can apply these recommended college credits toward a degree related to their career field or other field of their choice;
  6. a liaison with Naval Recruiting District Jacksonville in the Navy’s technical preparatory program. This program is designed for dual enrolled high school students who are enlisted in the Navy’s Delayed Entry Program (DEP).
  7. a liaison with the military education service officers to assist students in the use of the military service tuition assistance (TA) programs; and
  8. non–college credit courses and certificates for students desiring to upgrade career and occupational skills or seeking personal enrichment.

For information, call (904) 633-8134 or toll–free (877) 633-5950 or e-mail the Military Education Institute.

Study Abroad Program

Florida State College at Jacksonville sponsors a variety of study/travel abroad courses offering college credit. These courses are focused on certain aspects of selected foreign countries and include field experiences, and on–site lectures and discussions. Studying at a university in the foreign country is also a part of some study/travel abroad courses.

Orientation meetings and structured classes designed to strengthen educational experiences are held during the length of students’ enrollment in the activity.

Class attendance and participation in the scheduled events of the tours are mandatory. Regular admission policies of the College must be followed to enroll in the courses. Students are expected to pay their own transportation and other charges.

Study abroad/travel abroad courses are offered based on faculty interest and student enrollment.

Examples of the countries of focus for previous study/travel abroad courses include England, Greece, Italy, France and the Orient.

English for Academic Purposes (EAP)

Florida State College at Jacksonville has programs specifically designed for students whose first language is not English. The EAP program is designed for students who are preparing themselves for academic study and who must develop proficiency in the English language to succeed in their coursework.

Prior to registration, students take a placement test (CPT–L) to determine which level of instruction is most appropriate. Based upon the results of these placement test scores, students are assigned to Level IV, Level V or Level VI courses with the English for Academic Purposes (EAP) prefix. Each level consists of courses in:

  1. reading/vocabulary,
  2. writing/composition,
  3. speaking/listening and
  4. structure/grammar.

Level IV classes are considered college preparatory classes, not intended for transfer, counted for graduation or calculated in total hours or in grade point average. Up to 12 credits of Level V and Level VI classes may be counted as elective credit toward fulfilling the number of credits required for a degree. If students test into EAP courses, they are required to take these courses before enrolling into non–EAP college credit courses. Courses at each level involve 12 contact hours per week, which is a full course load. Students may take less than a full load of classes each term if desired. Upon completion of EAP courses, degree–seeking students and/or those wishing to take college credit English or reading courses must take the College Placement Test. For additional information contact the Liberal Arts office on Downtown Campus at (904) 633-8397.

Strategies for Success in College, Career and Life

SLS 0005/1103 Requirement Policy

Students who test into one or more college prep disciplines (English, mathematics, or reading) will be required to take a college prep SLS course (SLS 0005) or a college credit SLS course (SLS 1103). Students will take the SLS course in the first term of enrollment at the college. Students cannot drop or withdraw from the required SLS class without seeing a counselor or advisor.

Student Life Skills classes provide the essential content needed for students to succeed for college and beyond. These courses have shown to significantly increase the academic success and retention of college students. Students who take these courses persist in college and succeed in completing their degrees more often.

Course topics include:

  • Goals and priorities
  • Voice mail and e-mail etiquette
  • Maintaining commitment
  • Dealing with successes and failure
  • Communicating with individuals at work and at college professors, superiors, subordinates and peers
  • Verbal and non-verbal communication skills
  • Teamwork and decision making
  • Learning skills
  • Conflict management and resolution
  • Leadership styles and skills
  • Financial and debt management
  • Long-term planning for career, education and wellness

SLS 0005 and SLS 1103 provide a tremendous amount of information delivered in an active, engaging learning environment. Not only will this class build success skills for college work, but it also provides a foundation of behaviors, habits and skills that will enable students to succeed and thrive in the working world. Register for SLS 1103— Strategies for Success in College, Career and Life or SLS 0005 Foundations for College Success — or consult with an advisor for further details and information to determine which course to select.

In addition to SLS 1103 - Strategies for Success in College, Career and Life and SLS 0005 - Foundations of College Success, the College offers other Student Life Skills courses. However, these courses do not satisfy the SLS requirement.

  • SLS 1201 - Personal Development — Want to learn more about yourself and others?
  • SLS 1301 - Career Planning and the World of Work — Would you like to take a class to help you learn more about career planning and how your personal interests and attributes relate to careers?
  • SLS 1371 - Portfolio Development for Prior Learning — Do you have work or life experience that could earn you college credit?
  • SLS 1401 - Computerized Career Exploration — Need help choosing a career?
  • *SLS 1931 - Selected Topics in Student Life Skills
  • *SLS 1932 - Selected Topics in Student Life Skills
  • *SLS 1933 - Selected Topics in Student Life Skills

*These three courses are customized each time they are offered, in one, two and three credit courses.

 

The Academic Success Center: College Preparatory Courses

The Academic Success Center (ASC) program at Florida State College at Jacksonville provides instruction and student services designed to help students become college ready in reading, writing and mathematics. Located on each campus and center, the Academic Success Center is a laboratory learning environment based on diagnostic and prescriptive approaches; a variety of instructional methods, ranging from individualized instruction to cooperative learning; academic tutoring; and advising. Staffed with faculty and staff who specialize in college prep instruction, the ASC provides students with access to advanced learning technologies and discipline-specific software. Focused on fostering student success and retention, the Academic Success Center also includes an option for accelerated learning among highly motivated students.

Through the course placement testing program or additional assessment, students in need of further preparation should meet with an advisor to identify academic goals and the best curriculum to follow in order to achieve these goals.

All college preparatory studies courses taught in the Academic Success Center are considered to be pre–college level. They are not intended for transfer, counted for graduation, or calculated in total hours or grade point average. However, these courses will count as hours enrolled for financial aid/veteran purposes, social security, standards of academic progress, and other enrollment verifications. These courses are identified as college preparatory studies courses in the course description section.*

The following college preparatory studies courses are designed to bring students’ skills to the minimum college readiness level:

  • ENC 0015 - Essentials in Writing I
  • ENC 0025 - Essentials in Writing II
  • MAT 0018 - Basic Mathematics
  • MAT 0028 - Elementary Algebra
  • REA 0007 - Reading Comprehension
  • REA 0017 - Critical Reading Strategies

*Students who enter the College with English language needs should refer to the section for English for Academic Purposes (EAP) .

Students who test into one or more of these college preparatory studies courses must successfully complete the course(s) with a grade of C or higher* before enrolling in college credit courses in that skill area. College preparatory courses cannot replace required EAP courses.

Research has shown that students at Florida State College at Jacksonville who are successful in college preparatory studies miss fewer than four hours of class per semester. The College, therefore, has instituted an attendance policy for all college preparatory classes. College preparatory students should check the attendance policy in the course syllabus of each college preparatory course taken.

Full–time students who test into ENC 0015 and REA 0007 must take these two courses in their first term of enrollment. Full–time students who test into ENC 0015, REA 0007 or MAT 0018 must take all three of these courses in their first term of enrollment. Part–time students are recommended to take these college preparatory studies courses in the following order: reading, writing and mathematics.

Full–time students who test into either ENC 0025, REA 0017, MAT 0018 or MAT 0028 must enroll in at least one of these college preparatory studies courses each term until they have completed all such required courses.

Part–time students who test into either ENC 0015, REA 0007 or MAT 0018 must enroll in at least one of these courses each term until they have completed these courses. Part–time students who test into either ENC 0025, REA 0017 or MAT 0028 must enroll in these courses by the time they have accumulated 12 hours of college credit coursework and must maintain continuous enrollment in college preparatory coursework each semester until the requirements are completed.

Students who test into one or more college prep discipline areas will be required to take a four credit college prep SLS course (SLS 0005)** or a three credit SLS course (SLS 1103). Students will take the SLS course in the first term of enrollment at the college. Students who are taking SLS 0005 or SLS 1103 under this requirement cannot drop or withdraw from their SLS class without seeing a counselor or advisor; doing so will drop a student’s entire schedule. For more information, see the SLS section.

**SLS 0005 is numbered like a college prep course and will not count towards any degree but will count towards full time attendance.

Limits to Enrollment in Each College Prep Course

Florida State statute limits a student's enrollment in this course to three attempts. Unless a student officially withdraws before the drop deadline, each registration in this course will count as a semester of enrollment regardless of the grade received. Students may have only two attempts at a developmental education course at the in-state tuition rate. After two attempts, students must pay the out-of-state tuition rate, or may qualify for another remediation option, upon faculty recommendation, that provides an alternative to traditional classroom-based instruction.

Exceptions to this rule are subject to the student appeals process. Course attempts made prior to Fall Term 1997 do not count toward the two–term limitation. Students testing into remedial instruction may access alternative private sources for this instruction.

Grading Policies

Class Attendance

The policy on attendance for college classes will be the responsibility of the professor, and the professor will fully inform students of such policy at the beginning of the term.

The faculty and staff at Florida State College at Jacksonville want you to succeed. Since studies indicate a positive relationship between good attendance and better grades, you are strongly encouraged to attend all classes and arrive on time.

  • Individual instructors establish their own class attendance policies. Each instructor’s policy is included in the course materials distributed at the beginning of each term.
  • It is your responsibility to understand and follow these policies and, if possible, to notify instructors in advance when it is necessary to miss a class.
  • Any anticipated prolonged absences should be reported to instructors as soon as possible.
  • If you stop attending class(es) for any reason, you should consult with your instructor(s) about possible withdrawal from the class(es).

Audit Grade Procedures

A student must decide to audit a college credit course before the end of the drop/add period in the session in which the class is held by completing an request to audit form. Under extenuating circumstances, a change to or from audit status may be made after the drop/add period with approval through an academic appeal. All regular fees apply to audited courses, but no credit shall be awarded.

Grading System

Florida State College at Jacksonville's grading system is designed to evaluate the performance of students as fairly and equitably as possible.

Letter grades will be assigned for courses as follows:

A = Excellent
B = Good
C = Average
D = Poor
F = Failure
FN = Failure for Non-Attendance*
W = Withdrawal
I = Incomplete
X = Audit
NR = Not Reported by Instructor

*The FN grade indicates that a student has failed a course due to non-attendance. It is calculated as an F in the student's grade point average. For students receiving financial aid, failure for non-attendance may require the student to refund to the College all or part of his or her aid. The FN grade will be assigned by the faculty member at anytime following the final withdrawal date for the course. Students who are in a failing status because of non-attendance but return to the course prior to the withdrawal date may elect to withdraw from the course.

Grade Forgiveness and Course Repeats

Students may repeat a course in an attempt to improve a grade previously earned. State Board Rule 6A-14.0301 limits such attempts to courses where a "D", "NP", "F", or "FN" grade was earned, and limits to two the number of times a course grade may be forgiven. The official grade and the grade used in calculating the GPA will be the grade designated as "R" on the student transcript. Grade point averages for financial aid purposes may include all attempts.

A student may have only three total attempts in any course, including the original grade, repeat grades, and withdrawals. A fourth attempt may be allowed only through an academic appeals process based on major extenuating circumstances.

Courses may be repeated if they are designated as repeatable through the curriculum process or if they are required to be repeated by a regulatory agency, or are being repeated as part of a regulatory requirement for continuing education to stay current in a field, such as teacher certification.

Withdrawal Grades

A student may withdraw without academic penalty from any course up to the last withdrawal date published for each session. The student will be permitted only two withdrawals per course. Upon the third attempt, the student will not be permitted to withdraw and will receive an A, B, C, D, FN, or F grade for the course.

Students may request a withdrawal for extenuating circumstances after the session withdrawal date by following the grade appeal procedure.

To withdraw officially from one or more courses (withdrawal from all courses constitutes withdrawal from the College), the student must use the withdrawal process in the online student services portal.

Note: Students who receive Title IV Federal Aid and withdraw during the first 60 percent of the academic term will be subject to repayment terms as outlined by the federal agency from which the aid was awarded.

Incomplete Grades

An "I" grade may be assigned at the instructor's discretion, upon request by the student, to permit the student time to complete required course work that he/she was prevented from completing in a timely way due to non-academic reasons. The instructor may require the student to furnish documentation of the grounds of the request to assist in the decision. The instructor may choose to not grant the request. The "I" grade should be considered only when the student has the potential to earn a passing grade if the missing work is made up.

The instructor shall prescribe in a written agreement with the student the remaining course work required for completion and removal of the "I" grade. A copy of this agreement will be kept on file in the office of the appropriate dean. All work must be completed within the first eight weeks of the subsequent term, unless the instructor agrees to a longer timeframe (not to exceed one year). When the work is completed, the instructor will submit an online grade change with the grade earned. If the work is not completed within the prescribed time frame, the "I" will automatically change to an "F" grade. The student will be informed of the final grade assigned. To be eligible for an "I" grade, the student must be passing the course at the time of the request and must have completed at least 75% of the course work.

Student Warnings

When students repeat a course at Florida State College at Jacksonville, only the last grade earned is calculated in their cumulative grade point average (GPA). However, students with an excessive number of W, I or FN grades and students who repeat courses to improve their GPA may jeopardize their admission to programs in the Florida State University System (SUS) or other institutions.

Grade Points

To evaluate the scholastic standing of students, the following points are assigned to grades.

A = four grade points per semester hour
B = three grade points per semester hour
C = two grade points per semester hour
D = one grade point per semester hour
F = zero grade points per semester hour
FN = zero grade points per semester hour

Students' scholastic standing or grade point average is obtained by dividing the total number of grade points earned by the total number of semester hours attempted for which the foregoing grades have been assigned. Grades of I, W, NR and X are not used in the computation of grade point average. Grades earned in college preparatory classes do not count in the computation of the grade point average.

GPA Calculation Example

Course

 Grade 

 Credit Hours 
Attempted

Grade
 Points 

GPA
  Points 

GPA
  Hours 

ENC 1101

B

3.0

3.0

9.0

3.0

MAT 0024

A

4.0

4.0

0.0

0.0

AMH 2010

C

2.0

3.0

6.0

3.0

CGS 1060

D

1.0

3.0

3.0

3.0

Total

10.0

13.0

18.0

9.0

Formula: 18 GPA points divided by 9 GPA hours equals 2.00 GPA.

President's and Dean's List

Degree seeking students who achieve academic excellence during a term are recognized by being placed on the College President's or Dean's list. The Registrar's office posts the designation on the transcript three weeks after the completion of each term. The criteria of eligibility for each list are described below.

College President's List

To qualify, a student must have all the following criteria:

  1. minimum enrollment of at least six (6) credit hours in the term (excluding college preparatory classes);
  2. minimum of twelve (12) credit hours earned at FSCJ (excludes transfer and preparatory courses);
  3. FSCJ cumulative GPA of 3.0; and
  4. term GPA of 3.75-4.0, with no grade of "I," "W," "NR", "X", "F," or "FN".

Dean's List

To qualify, a student must have all the following criteria:

  1. minimum enrollment of at least six (6) credit hours in the term (excludes college preparatory classes);
  2. minimum of twelve (12) credit hours earned at FSCJ (excludes transfer and preparatory courses);
  3. FSCJ cumulative GPA of 3.0; and
  4. term GPA of 3.5-3.74, with no grade of "I," "W," "NR", "X", "F," or "FN".

Grade Changes

A grade may only be changed with the concurrence of the instructor of record and the instructor's supervisor. If the instructor of record is no longer available, a grade may be changed by the instructor of record's supervisor with approval of the campus president. The completed grade change must be submitted to the Registrar's Office within one semester following the semester in which the original grade was earned.

Standards of Academic Progress

Florida State College at Jacksonville is dedicated to providing students with a high quality educational experience in an environment supportive of intellectual and personal development. The purpose of the Standards of Academic Progress (SOAP) is to clearly communicate the College’s minimum expectations of academic progress.

College Credit Standards of Academic Progress

Students Who Will Be Affected

The standards described below are effective at the beginning of fall semester 2005. These standards supersede the previously published standards and will be applied to all college credit degree seeking students who have enrolled in a Florida State College at Jacksonville for a cumulative total of 6 or more credits. A student’s cumulative Florida State College at Jacksonville coursework (including college preparatory courses) will be used in the determination of academic status.

New and returning students with fewer than 6 credits of enrollment will be evaluated initially at the end of the semester in which they enroll in a Florida State College at Jacksonville cumulative total of 6 or more credits, including preparatory courses.

Transfer students entering Florida State College at Jacksonville will be evaluated once their records indicate 6 or more Florida State College at Jacksonville credits of enrollment, including preparatory courses. Transfer credit will not be included in the determination of status.

*Please note that these standards are not the same as those applicable to financial aid. See the Financial Aid section  of the catalog for financial aid standards.

Specific Standards

In order to maintain satisfactory academic progress, students must achieve the following minimum cumulative standards each term:

  • Percentage of Semester Courses Successfully Completed: 50%
    (W, F and FN count as unsuccessful)
  • Required SOAP Cumulative Grade Point Average: 2.0
  • Required SOAP Term Grade Point Average: 2.0

Satisfactory Standing

Students who meet or exceed the established cumulative standards will be considered to have satisfactory standing under the SOAP standards. Students who are placed on academic warning or academic probation will be returned to satisfactory standing as soon as they bring their SOAP Cumulative GPA to a 2.0 or higher and successfully complete at least 50% of their coursework – also the standard for satisfactory progress during any given semester if on warning or probation.

Standards for Students on Academic Warning, Academic Probation and Academic Suspension

Academic Warning

Students who do not meet the standards for satisfactory standing will initially be placed on academic warning. All students placed on warning must meet with a properly credentialed employee during the semester before registering for future semesters. Students who make satisfactory progress during the semester will remain on academic warning until they return to satisfactory standing.

Academic Probation

Students who do not make satisfactory progress based on the standard while on academic warning will be placed on academic probation the next enrollment semester. All students placed on probation must meet with a properly credentialed employee during the semester before registering for future semesters. When an employee deems a student to be in need of in-depth intervention, a counselor will assist the student. Their enrollment will be limited to 9 credits per semester (fall, spring or summer). Approval of the nine credits will be at the discretion of the campus student success dean or the dean’s designee. Additional credits may be granted at the discretion of the campus student success dean based only on documented extenuating circumstances (death in the family, illness, family crisis or accident) or educationally sound reasons. The loss of Social Security, financial aid, veterans assistance, insurance or other benefits is not included in the definition of extenuating circumstances. Students who make academic progress will remain on probation until they return to satisfactory standing.

Suspension

Students who do not make satisfactory progress (i.e., 2.0 SOAP GPA or greater and 50% successful semester course completion) while on academic probation will be placed on academic suspension and must wait one semester before reinstatement is possible. Students on academic suspension should seek reinstatement by contacting a student success office approximately two months prior to the beginning of the semester they wish to re-enter Florida State College at Jacksonville.

Notification of Status

All students placed on academic warning, academic probation or academic suspension will be formally notified of their status by the College. Students placed on warning, probation, or suspension should meet immediately with a properly credentialed employee to determine what action can be taken to return to satisfactory progress.

Reinstatement Process
  1. Following the suspension period, students who wish to re-enter Florida State College at Jacksonville must com¬plete an application for reinstatement available at any campus student success office. All students requesting reinstatement must meet with the campus dean of student success or the dean’s designee. The campus dean of student success or the dean’s designee will enter the approval for all reinstatements.
  2. Suspended students who apply for rein¬state¬ment will be reinstated on probation and allowed to register for a maximum of 9 credit hours.
  3. Students may be granted additional credits at the discretion of the campus student success dean based only on documented extenuating circumstances (death in the family, illness, family crisis or accident) or edu¬ca¬tionally sound reasons. The loss of Social Security, financial aid, veterans assistance, insurance or other benefits is not included in the definition of extenuating circumstances. Students must also have shown progress in the probationary period prior to being suspended and the extenuating circumstance must have occurred in the probationary period prior to suspension.
  4. Students who are approved for reinstatement may register for the subsequent semester if satisfactory academic progress is made. At any time following the first re-enrollment semester after suspension, the campus dean may approve registration for additional credits. Once students return to satisfactory standing, registration will not be limited by this rule.
  5. Reinstated students who do not make satisfactory progress during a semester of reinstatement will be suspended and restricted from registration for one academic year. At the conclusion of the suspension period, these students may apply for reinstatement as described in paragraph one (1) above.
  6. Immediate Reinstatements – Students will be immediately reinstated if a grade change restores them to satisfactory standing.

Postsecondary Workforce Training Standards of Academic Progress

The same standards and procedures for college credit students also will apply to students in postsecondary adult workforce (PSAV) programs with one exception: the 50 percent completion requirement will not apply to students in PSAV programs. At the end of each semester, instructional program managers will evaluate students for academic progress and apply appropriate interventions. Students suspended from PSAV programs will follow the same reinstatement procedures as college credit students; however, registration limitations for students returning from suspension will be at the discretion of the program manager.

Standards of Academic Progress for Students in Vocational Preparatory Instruction (VPI)

Prior to PSAV Program Midpoint

Prior to the midpoint of their program of study, students whose TABE scores are within two grade levels of the exit requirement for their program may enroll simultaneously in their PSAV courses and required VPI until they reach the mid-point of their PSAV program. If a student does not test within two grade levels of the exit requirement for their program, the student must enroll only in VPI courses. Once the student earns a TABE score no more than two grade levels from the exit requirement, the student may enroll in PSAV coursework.

At the PSAV Program Midpoint

Once students reach the midpoint of their PSAV program, they must have earned a TABE score within one grade level of their program exit requirement. If students have not earned a TABE score within one grade level of the exit requirement by the mid-point of the program, they must enroll only in VPI coursework. When the student earns a TABE score which is no more than one grade level below the exit requirement, the student will be permitted to continue with PSAV coursework.

At the PSAV Program 75 Percent Point

Once students have completed 75 percent of the coursework of their PSAV program of study, they must earn a TABE score that meets or exceeds the exit requirement. If students have not earned a TABE score that meets or exceeds the exit requirement by the 75 percent completion point of their program, they must enroll only in VPI coursework. Once the student has earned a TABE score that meets or exceeds their exit requirement, the student will be permitted to continue and complete PSAV coursework.

Prior Learning Assessment

Credit for Military, Work and Other Non–College Training

Individuals who have submitted an application for admission to the College as a degree–seeking student may request an evaluation of valuable non–college training and certifications. Options for Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) include: credit for military training; credit for work, certifications or formal training; and credit for other prior learning.

Credit for Military Training

Individuals who have submitted an application for admission to the College as a degree–seeking student may request an evaluation of military training and experience by submitting to a campus enrollment services office the appropriate American Council on Education (ACE) Registry Transcript (SMART for U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, and AARTS for U.S. Army) and/or an institutional transcript from a military institution (CCAF – Community College of the Air Force, ARNGI – Army National Guard Institute, USCGI – United States Coast Guard Institute, U.S. Naval Academy, U.S. Military Academy, U.S. Air Force Academy). Electronic transcript requests can be made by visiting our Credit from Military Experience Web page, and clicking on the link appropriate to the students’ branch of service. Students receiving veterans educational benefits must have their military training evaluated to continue receiving benefits. For more information contact the Military Education Institute.

Credit for Work, Certifications or Formal Training

Non–college training includes training that is provided by organizations other than a college or university, including industry–sponsored training and industry–recognized certifications. Credit for such educational experiences may be granted in accordance with the recommendations of the American Council on Education (ACE) or the National College Credit Recommendation Service (National CCRS) when applicable to the student’s program of study. Information on the documentation required to apply for these credits can be obtained from the enrollment services offices or online at the American Council on Education or the National CCRS websites.

Credit for Other Prior Learning

Individuals who have submitted an application for admission to the College as a degree–seeking student may obtain college credit for theory and knowledge acquired through life/work experiences that are equivalent to college level course work. The optimal way to accomplish this is through standardized examination and testing.

If an examination does not exist or if an alternative method is preferred, students may consider submitting a portfolio that documents their prior learning. Students seeking credit using portfolio development must contact their advisor and gain approval from the Accelerated College Program office before registering for the Portfolio Development for Prior Learning course (SLS 1371 or CWO 0404). Once enrolled, the student will learn how to complete a portfolio documenting prior learning as it relates to a specific course in the selected program of study. The student may then submit portfolios for faculty evaluation and recommendation to award college credit. Completing the portfolio development course and submitting a portfolio for evaluation does not guarantee approval for college credit. Evaluation fees are set by the District Board of Trustees.

Glossary of Terms

Academic Transcript
An official record of a student's academic history including biographical data, degrees, certificates, diplomas or honors received, and grade point average.

Advanced Technical Certificate (ATC)
The Advanced Technical Certificate is a program of instruction consisting of at least nine credit hours but less than 45 credit hours of college-level courses. The certificate is awarded to students who have already received an Associate in Science or related undergraduate degree and who are seeking an advanced specialized program of study to supplement their degree. Offered as college credit.

Applied Technology Diploma (ATD)
A career-credential that consists of a course of study that is part of an A.S., is less than 60 hours, and leads to employment. Guaranteed statewide articulation into the A.S. within three years of completion of the ATD and upon presentation of an official transcript. Offered as college credit.

Associate in Arts (A.A.) Also known as the university parallel or transfer program.
Designed for students who plan to complete their freshman and sophomore years of college work at Florida at Jacksonville and then transfer as juniors to four-year colleges or universities.

Associate in Science (A.S.)
Career education programs designed to allow students to immediately pursue careers that require a college degree at the technician or paraprofessional level. Several degrees transfer to a university.

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.)
Upper level degrees for students who have earned an associate degree or higher and wish to further their education.

College Preparatory Studies
Courses designed to enhance student skills in reading, writing and/or computation in order to prepare them more thoroughly for success in college level courses.

Corequisites
Courses that are taken at the same time during the same academic session.

Credit Hour
Unit of measure for college credit course work. Except for laboratory, music and studio art courses, a credit hour typically corresponds to 50 minutes of class instruction per week for one semester. Traditionally classes are three credit hours.

Degree Audit (DA)
A report that identifies the student's primary program of study, lists the program requirements and summarizes the progress toward graduation.

Degree Seeking Students
Students who have been admitted to a degree awarding program (B.S., B.S.N., B.A.S., A.A., A.S.) or a college credit technical certificate program.

Distance Learning Courses
A combination of televised or computer delivered lessons, readings in a study guide and textbook, faculty interaction and testing that is an alternative to traditional, campus-based instruction.

Elective
Courses in addition to the general education requirement. In most cases, the course should relate to the student's major. Consult your counselor or advisor for more information.

Forgiveness Policy
Policy that allows a student to repeat a course in an attempt to improve the grade. Course may be repeated no more than two times. The grade used in calculating GPA will be the last assigned grade, although all attempts will appear on the transcript.

General Education Requirements (GER)
Core of courses designed to develop skills, attitudes and understanding in broad discipline areas: social sciences, humanities, natural sciences, mathematics and communication.

Gordon Rule
Florida law that requires inclusion of writing requirements and computational skills in certain courses.

Grade Points
A numerical value assigned to each grade for the purpose of computing grade point average (GPA). See the section on grading for more information.

Grade Point Average (GPA)
A measure of the student's scholastic standing obtained by dividing the total number of grade points earned by the total number of credit hours attempted.

Non-Degree Seeking Students
Students wishing to earn college credit for self-enrichment, teacher certification or transfer to another college.

Prerequisites
Courses that are required for entrance into a particular program or required before a student may take a particular course.

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)
All students receiving Title IV financial aid funds must meet Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) in order to receive Title IV funds.

Selective Access
Programs that have special selection and admission criteria and procedures, which may be obtained from the program office as listed in this catalog.

Standards of Academic Progress (SOAP)
The purpose of SOAP is to clearly communicate to students the College's minimum expectations of academic progress. The student's academic standing will be indicated as one of the following: satisfactory, academic warning, academic probation or suspension.

Technical Certificate
College credit program of study designed to provide the basic professional courses of an occupation.

Transcript
Official record of a student's academic standing, including biographical and test data.

Workforce Certificate (formerly Post-Secondary Adult Vocation [PSAV])
Career training programs for students planning to enter vocational and technical career fields which do not require a degree.

Twenty-five Secrets to College Success

Success in your college studies is the result of many factors. Here are some practical things you can do to increase your chances of success.

  1. Develop a Clear Goal
    Why are you going to college? What do you hope to accomplish? What career do you want to pursue? If you know what you want, it is also often easier to endure what must be done to get there. Enrolling in SLS 1301 - Career Planning and the World of Work and SLS 1401 - Computerized Career Exploration may be a good way to clarify your career goal. If you would rather do it yourself, self–directed “Career Options” booklets are available from any campus student success office.
  2. Have an Academic and Career Plan
    Academic advising is an important part of any student’s success. Your counselor or advisor can help you determine exactly what courses you need to take for a given program, major and transfer institution. For students planning to transfer to a university, requirements often vary from one university to another and usually involve certain prerequisite courses that you need to work into your program of study. You should select a major and transfer institution as soon as you can, since some programs of study have many prerequisite courses. It is also a good idea to meet with a counselor or advisor any time your plans change. You may make an appointment in any campus counseling and advising center.
  3. Set Clear Priorities
    Without clear priorities, what is more important can sometimes get lost in what is more fun or exciting. You should have a clear sense of what comes first and should monitor your own activities to make sure they reflect this set of priorities. Developing a weekly schedule – with an appropriate balance between your priorities – is one way to do this.
  4. Take an Appropriate Class Load
    Twelve credit hours is a minimum full–time class load. If you are employed 20 or more hours a week, you should probably take three to nine credit hours (one to three classes), depending upon the difficulty of the classes, the amount of time you have to study, your GPA and other factors. If you are not sure, generally it is better to take a lighter load rather than risking one that is too heavy. Students who are not working and who have a high GPA (3.0 or higher) can often take 15 (or sometimes more) credit hours. Summer (six weeks) term class loads should usually be no more than half as many credits as during a fall or spring term.
  5. Review Your Degree Audit
    Your degree audit summarizes your progress toward your degree and lets you see what you have yet to finish. The degree audit does not include university prerequisites; see a counselor or advisor for this information. To obtain your degree audit go to FACTS.org.
  6. Register Early
    The earlier you register, the better selection of classes you will have. It is a good idea to seek academic advising before the beginning of registration.
  7. Use College Resources
    Florida State College at Jacksonville has many resources that can help you succeed. You should familiarize yourself with the assistance available within the learning center (help with reading, writing, mathematics and other subjects), the career center, the computer lab, the learning resources center (library), the foreign language lab and the campus counseling and advising center.
  8. Know College Rules and Procedures
    You should thoroughly familiarize yourself with the information in your College catalog; the procedures for dropping or withdrawing from classes, the grading system, deadline dates (listed in the catalog calendar), the student code of conduct and grade appeal procedures are some of the things you need to know about.
  9. Sharpen Your Learning Skills
    Many students have difficulty simply because they have never learned certain basic study skills. Develop these skills by adding Strategies for Success in College, Career and Life (SLS 1103) or the college prep SLS 0005 to your schedule. You’ll gain a unique advantage in the classroom and in the workplace with the survival and success skills taught in this course. Topics include goals and priorities, maintaining commitment, teamwork and decision making, learning skills, leadership styles and skills, and much more.
  10. Develop Computer Skills
    No matter what your major or program, computer skills will be helpful to you. Word processing, for example, can greatly increase your efficiency with any kind of writing assignment. Computing resources are generally available in the learning resources center and the computer lab. OST 1100 - Keyboarding/Introduction to Word Processing (for those without typing skills) and/or OST 2771 - Word Processing I can be good courses to develop these skills. Non–credit courses are also readily available.
  11. Speed Up Your Reading
    Reading speed and comprehension are fundamental to college success. No matter how well you presently read, you will benefit by increasing your reading skills. By doubling your speed (often a realistic goal), you can cut in half the time required to read certain kinds of assignments. Such courses are often taught in continuing education programs.
  12. Develop Critical and Creative Thinking Skills
    One of the ways that college is different from high school is the degree to which professors expect you to be able to think in analytical and creative ways. These skills come more naturally to some people than others, but anyone can enhance them by following certain guidelines and through proper practice. Two particularly useful books on this subject are “Brain Power” by Karl Albrecht and “A Whack on the Side of the Head” by Roger von Oech.
  13. Attend All Your Classes
    This is the simplest way to get better grades. Many students fail simply because they miss class and, therefore, fall behind in their work. Also, some instructors have an attendance policy (outlined in their course syllabus) that allows only a few absences before your grade is affected. Other professors may not have an attendance requirement, but do not be misled – they will still hold you responsible for what is covered in class and for the work you miss.
  14. Be Prepared for Class
    This is an obvious but often neglected principle. Being prepared for class means having your assignments done on time, completing the required reading in your text and giving some thought beforehand to the day’s topic of discussion.
  15. Read Your Course Syllabus Carefully
    Your instructor is obligated to provide you with a course syllabus that summarizes the requirements of the class, the basis for assigning grades, any attendance policy and other relevant information. Read this very carefully and ask questions about anything you do not understand.
  16. Talk to Your Instructors
    If you are having difficulty in a class, often the best thing to do is to talk to your instructor. He or she may be able to suggest better ways to approach the material or other ways to get help with your class work. Be sure to ask about any class assignments or requirements that may not be clear to you. Also, if you are going to ask for an exception to an established class policy or procedure, it is often best to make an appointment and do so in private.
  17. Start or Join a Study Group
    It is often helpful to study with a group of other students taking the same class. This gives you a convenient way to ask questions about assignments, share insights, compare notes and quiz each other in preparation for exams.
  18. Ask Questions
    Don’t be afraid to ask questions when you are not sure about something. Instructors usually appreciate questions as a way of clarifying what they are teaching. Asking questions is the most direct way to find out what you need to know. If you have a question concerning College policy or procedure, the campus counseling and advising center can usually be of some assistance.
  19. Use Supplemental Textbooks
    If you are having difficulty following the material presented in a text, you can often find another text covering the same material in a different way. By doing a little research in the library, you can locate another book that is more in tune with the way you like to learn, that provides examples or presents the material in a clearer fashion. Ask a librarian for assistance with this.
  20. Be Persistent
    The best way to achieve your educational goals is to stay in school. This sounds simple, but many people drop out before they have really given themselves a fair chance to succeed.
  21. Participate in Other Activities
    There is more to campus life than just attending classes. Participation in student activities, clubs and other organizations can make you feel more a part of the College, help you develop leadership skills and give you the opportunity to develop friendships. Stop by your campus Student Life and Leadership Development office for more information.
  22. Face Problems Head–on
    If you are having a problem related to your school work, it is wise to do something about it as soon as you can. If you are not sure what to do about a concern, a counselor can often help you clarify your situation and your options.
  23. Be Assertive
    Learn to stand up for your rights. The College has grievance and appeals procedures to help assure your fair treatment. If you think you’ve been treated unfairly or unreasonably, make an appointment to talk with a counselor or the campus dean of student success to get some advice on how to best handle your situation.
  24. Get To Know Yourself Better
    The more accurate and realistic you are about your goals, abilities, skills and circumstances, the better able you are to chart out a wise course to college success. A counselor can also provide you with information about personality testing if you think this may be helpful.
  25. Assume Responsibility for Your Success
    No one has more to gain (or lose) than you. Every decision that you make makes a difference – how you spend your time, how carefully you complete your assignments, how hard you study for an exam and how determined you are in achieving your goals – each such decision will either bring you a step closer or further away from your goals.